How people spend Christmas in Japan

Christmas season has arrived! Are you preparing for Christmas?

People are celebrating this festive season in many different ways around the world....


In Japan, Christmas is not considered a religious event. It is more like festivity for children and couples. For example, children are usually enjoying a Christmas party at home with friends and family, and given Christmas presents.

For Christmas dinner, they often eat roast chicken and fried chicken, instead of turkey. They also eat “Japanese Christmas cakes” on Christmas evening.The most typical “Japanese Christmas cake” is a sponge cake frosted with whipped cream, decorated with strawberries and festive ornaments! On the other hand, many couples tend to go out for a special dinner and exchange expensive gifts. Needless to say, it’s a big event for couples.



Now you might wonder how to spend Christmas, if you are single...

Actually, we have a word for people who spend Christmas alone, "Kuri-bocchi” (クリぼっち). “Kuri-bocchi” is two words combined “クリスマス(Christmas)”and “一人ぼっち(Alone)”. Also, you can call such girlsKuri-bocchi Joshi (クリぼっち女子)”.


You may think that Kuri-bocchi” (クリぼっち) feel lonely, because they see many couples having a good time everywhere? Should Kuri-bocchi” (クリぼっち) stay home to avoid that?


No worries! Kuri-bocchi” (クリぼっち) can enjoy Christmas positively! These days some restaurants serve special Christmas dinner and tables for Kuri-bocchi” (クリぼっち), and some shops create special products for Kuri-bocchi” (クリぼっち). For example, convenience stores sell various one-person sized Christmas cakes. Also, you can find meetups and parties for Kuri-bocchi” (クリぼっち) easily. Thus, Christmas is not only for children and couples, but also Kuri-bocchi” (クリぼっち) now!


And...luckily, Christmas is not a public holiday, so “Kuri-bocchi” (クリぼっち) can work as usual...and totally ignore the atmosphere if they want to!


We hope everyone can have a lovely time with someone special or alone in their own way!

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